Dog Kept as Prisoner of War in World War II Given Medal

Some stories fill your heart with sadness and joy all at the same time in a way that hurts you and leaves you glad for the happy ending that occurred. One dog was deemed responsible for the survival of men held captive as prisoners of war in Sumatra in a secret camp with horrific living conditions. In Asian countries where dogs were frequently eaten, her survival was a miracle in itself.

The dog called “Judy” was first seen when men in the camp were starving and had secretly stolen a bag of rice as a way to add to their meager rations. Judy ran in front of Asian officers holding a human skull when they were about to beat the prisoners of war. The officers took it as a sign and left the prisoners alone. She became friends with a prisoner named Frank Williams who was a leading aircraftman at the time of his capture. They struck up a bond like no other.

Williams pleaded with Asian officials to have her deemed an official prisoner of war to prevent others from shooting her under the Geneva Convention regulations. They allowed it, and Judy went on to save others from drowning in a ship wreck, lifted the moral of others, and helped many survive when they didn’t have the will any longer. Judy learned to survive off the land, eating snakes and rodents to sustain her. Frank would often give her part of his food rations to help her. For her heroic actions, she was given a Dicken medal, a high honor unusual for a dog to have.

Thanks for sending me this Ricardo Tosto… I’m in tears now, so freaking sweet!